Happy Chanukkah!

Happy Chanukkah to all of my Jewish Readers who visit The Rogue Jew and find solace that there is a Jew out and about that has not become one of the many Sheeple that blindly follow the Liberal Democrats as they lead us to slaughter with their defeatist mentality and appeasement of our enemies that as history as proven time and time again, does not work and does not bring about world peace for all mankind and all that other liberal gobbledy gook.

I find it hard to believe that even Liberal Jews could fully understand and appreciate Hanukkah because it is a celebration of a Military victory in which the Jewish people defeated an enemy that wanted to eliminate them and their religion. Funny how history seems to just keep replaying itself over and over again because the same people who are targeted for slaughter seem to fall into the same trance over and over and over again and virtually lead themselves into the ovens.


I put together a little history lesson of what Chanukkah is:

Hanukkah is an eight-night celebration. In 2005, the holiday begins at sundown on the 25th of December on the Western (Gregorian) calendar, which is the 25th of Kislev on the Hebrew calendar. The Hanukkah celebration includes lighting the candles of the Hanukiyah (in English-speaking countries this is often called a Menorah, which is the Hebrew word for a candelabra) on each day of the holiday, playing with the dreidel, eating latkes and exchanging Hanukkah gelt.

Hanukkah is about history. The celebration of Hanukkah is a commemoration of an event that happened more than 2,000 years ago.

The story of Chanukkah begins in the reign of Alexander the Great. Alexander conquered Syria, Egypt and Palestine, but allowed the lands under his control to continue observing their own religions and retain a certain degree of autonomy. Under this relatively benevolent rule, many Jews assimilated much of Hellenistic culture, adopting the language, the customs and the dress of the Greeks, in much the same way that Jews in America today blend into the secular American society.

In 167 B.C., the Syrian king Antiochus IV began to outlaw Jewish religious practices and forced Jews to adopt Greek rituals. His men took control of the Jews’ Holy Temple in Jerusalem, looted it and erected an idol of a Greek god there. One Jewish family, the Hasmoneans (led by Mattityahu and his five sons), decided to take a stand against the persecution. The Greek forces arrived in the town of Modiin, near Jerusalem. It was here that after refusing to violate his own religion by praying to the Greek god Zeus, Mattityahu attacked the Greek soldiers.

This action began the Jewish rebellion. Mattityahu and his sons became known as the Maccabees, which means “men who are as strong as hammers” in Hebrew. The small army, led by Mattityahu’s most famous son, Judah Maccabee, fought sizeable Greek forces. In 165 B.C., the Maccabees were triumphant. On the 25th of the Hebrew month Kislev, the Maccabees reclaimed the Holy Temple.

They decided to rededicate the temple — the word “Hanukkah” means dedication. The Jewish army was unable to find enough oil to light the Menorah, or candle holder, to be used in the service. The Maccabees found only one bottle of oil, enough for only a single night. Miraculously, the oil lasted eight nights, giving the Jews time to produce more oil.

The holiday of Hanukkah commemorates this miracle. By lighting candles for eight nights, beginning every year on the 25th of Kislev (usually in December on the Western calendar, but not always), Jews celebrate the triumph of the Maccabees, the rededication of the Holy Temple and the miracle of the oil lasting for eight days.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s